Resources

Reading Lists

Books on Reading Aloud

Trelease’s book on the benefits of reading aloud is the bible on the subject. Includes lists of recommended books for reading aloud.

“When Alice Ozma was nine years old, her father made a promise: to read to her every night, without missing a night, for one-hundred nights. But once the pair met their goal, they couldn’t stop. 100 became 1,000, and eventually, they decided to read as long as they possibly could. The Reading Streak, as they called it, ultimately lasted 3,218, finally ending on Alice’s first day of college.  The story of their amazing commitment to reading, and to each other, is chronicled in Alice Ozma’s book The Reading Promise: My Father and the Books We Shared.”  

  • 100 Best Books for Children: A Parent’s Guide to Making the Right Choices for Your Young Reader, Toddler to Preteen  by Anita Silvey.

Former editor of the Horn Book Magazine and publisher of children’s books for Houghton Mifflin, Silvey points to the 100 best classic and recent favorites that no child should miss. Organized by age, she provides description and plot summaries, along with interesting insights about “the story behind the story that only an insider would know.”

Organizations

The St. Louis County Library partners with four area hospitals to communicate the importance of reading from birth. New parents are provided with “a gift bag from the library containing a board book, bath toy, activity calendar, milestone marker and instructions on how to get a library card. Parents will also receive an invitation to celebrate their child’s first birthday at the library where they will receive another free book.”

“Reach Out and Read’s thousands of doctors and nurses promote early literacy and school readiness to young children and their families in all 50 states. Each year, medical providers at the nearly 5,000 Reach Out and Read program sites nationwide distribute 6.5 million books to children and invaluable literacy advice to parents.”

“In 1995, Dolly Parton launched an exciting new effort, Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, to benefit the children of her home county in East Tennessee, USA. Dolly’s vision was to foster a love of reading among her county’s preschool children and their families by providing them with the gift of a specially selected book each month. By mailing high quality, age-appropriate books directly to their homes, she wanted children to be excited about books and to feel the magic that books can create. Moreover, she could insure that every child would have books, regardless of their family’s income. Dolly’s Imagination Library became so popular that in the year 2000 she announced that she would make the program available for replication to any community that was willing to partner with her to support it locally. Since the initial program launch in the United States, Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library has gone from just a few dozen books to over 60,000,000 books mailed to children in the United States, into Canada and across the proverbial pond into the United Kingdom!”